LOT NO.
41

Sakti Burman

Musicians Playing for Krishna
oil on canvas
63.75 x 51.25 in. (162 x 130 cm.)
painted in 2015
Winning Bid: $ 140,000
Estimate: US$ 140,000 - 200,000
Lot Closed

Lot Details

Signed 'Sakti Burman' (lower right)

PROVENANCE
Private collection, Dubai

Much like his influences from India and France, Sakti Burman organizes the narrative of his works from both the grand mythologies of the world and from personal myth. Drawing instinctively from varied religious traditions and folklores as much as he borrows from his everyday encounters, his frames are graced by families and friends often seen accompanying gods, nymphs, heroes and celestial emissaries into ethereal fantasy and reverie.

Sakti's fascination with demotic imageries is apparent in the current lot. Employing the Kalighat ethos, he humanized Lord Krishna in the picture. Here, he presented the god as a child dancing with the cow as his mount. Lord Krishna as dancer and flautist is a recurrent object of painterly devotion for Burman. To one side stands a human father carrying his child and on the other side is a flautist. Seated below is an accordion player. Both musicians are playing music to Krishna's dancing; blurring the boundaries between the world of mortals and gods. The picture also includes Sakti's recurring characters like harlequin and other mythical creatures joining in a blissful coexistence. Sakti conceives paradoxical imagery depicting familial relationships, celestial and terrestrial figures of dreams and perceived reality; tying them cohesively in a powerful narrative.

"Child and Supreme God, serenader of women and killer demons, the divine flautist is often at the centre of a dance of other figures from Burman's ongoing fantasia: sometimes, the peacock; at other times, a chorus of adolescents; on occasion, a centaur-like figure who prances yet remains melancholy, keeps the beat of the dance yet retains the detachment of the observer. Perhaps that centaur-like figure is, once again, the artist as chronicler and archivist of human dispositions, marking the rhythm of point and counterpoint." (Ranjit Hoskote, Sakti Burman: In The Presence Of Another Sky, Art Musings, India, pg. 245)

Sakti Burman

(b. 1935)
Born in Kolkata, Sakti Burman graduated from the Government College of Arts and Crafts, Kolkata, in 1956 and then went on to study at the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux Arts in Paris, where, in 1956, he won the Prix des Etrangers. Some of the most recent solo shows of his work include a retrospective at the Lalit Kala Akademi, New Delhi, Jehangir Art Gallery, Mumbai, Victoria Memorial Hall, Kolkata, and DakshinaChitra, Chennai, in 2012; at Apparao Galleries, Chennai in 2011; Pundole Art Gallery, Mumbai, in 2011, 2006, 2001, 1990, 1988, 1977, 1970 and 1967; Aicon Gallery, London and New York, in 2009; Art Musings, Mumbai, in 2009; and Maison de I’Unesco, in 2008. Burman’s works have also been featured at Saffronart’s exhibitions in Los Angeles in 2001 and in New York in 2002; at the Rand Palais, Paris, in 1975 and 1994; and at the French Biennales in 1963, 1965 and 1967. The artist lives and works in Paris.