Natvar Bhavsar

(b. 1934) Born in 1934 in Gothava village in India to a wealthy family, Bhavsar is an Indian - American artist, based in Soho, New York City for nearly 50 years, noted as an abstract expressionist and color field artist. Bhavsar's paintings appear in more than 800 private and public collections, including the collections of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney, Australia, the Library of Congress, NYU's Grey Art Gallery, and the Australian National Gallery. In addition, his works have been purchased and displayed by corporations such as the American Express Company, AT&T, Chase Manhattan Bank, and NBC. Bhavsar and his works have been the subject of books, including: Natvar Bhavsar: The Sound of Color, (Robert C. Morgan, 2002) and Natvar Bhavsar: Painting and the Reality of Color, (Irving Sandler, 1999). He studied at the Seth CN College of Fine Arts in Ahmedabad. He also graduated in English literature from Gujarat University. Bhavsar earned a Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Design in 1965, and received a Rockefeller grant. Bhavsar attained prominence as an artist in India by age 19, working primarily in the Cubist vein. After moving to New York City, he became influenced by the freedom of abstract painting. His style evolved into abstract expressionism and color field painting, and his works often feature a hazy object (absent of direct lines or geometric shapes) in the center of a solid canvas, that projects an astral-like mass of color. Bhavsar primarily shows his work at galleries in New York, Zurich, Switzerland and Bombay, India. He has been exhibiting his works in one-man shows since 1970. In 2007, the Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University sponsored an exhibition of about 50 of Bhavsar’s works. It was the first United States university to hold a one-man show of a South Asian artist.