LOT NO.
3

Company Painting

Brahmin with a waterpot
gouache on paper
folio 13 x 8 in. (32.8 x 20.1 cm.)
painting 7 x 4.5 in. (18 x 11.1 cm.)
Tanjore, c. 1850
Winning Bid: $ 600
Estimate: US$ 600 - 900
Lot Closed

Lot Details

PROVENANCE
Private collection, USA

A Brahmin wearing a white dhoti with red trim and two angavastra, his head shaved and stubbled apart from a back kudumi, stands carrying a waterpot. He wears a red tilaka on his forehead with a vertical black stripe running through it and leaf designs both open and in the shape of a banyan leaf on his face and body. A necklace of shells is around his neck and a yajnopavita or sacred thread around his body.

The leaf designs are connected with the cult of the boy Krishna.

Southern Indian artists in the 18th century were among the first to adapt their styles and subject matters for their new patrons from the French and English East India Companies. Hindu deities and religious scenes had been the traditional decorations on the walls of temples throughout the south, so it was a simple matter for the artists to produce sets of deities and festivals on paper to inform westerners of the many unfamiliar aspects of south Indian Hinduism. These paintings were painted in brilliant colours against an uncoloured ground. It was again a relatively easy further step for these artists also to produce sets of occupations, castes, ascetics and festivals when British tastes changed to want permanent records of local life. The figures were normally in the early period painted in pairs, a man and his wife, originally standing on a simply painted ground and with a blue sky background behind them, sometimes with a narrow strip of tangled clouds at the top. Around 1800 more details of landscapes and more naturalistic clouds were added and the clouds began to cover the whole sky in jagged alternations of blue and grey.

Men from Tanjore of the muchi or leather-workers caste are thought to have been the artists of these sets, although inscriptions of some of the albums and paintings indicate that they must have moved to other towns, particularly Madras, in search of employment, where they continued to paint their traditional subjects. Other centres where they are known to have painted included Vellore and Trichinopoly. The artists based in Trichinopoly specialised in painting on small sheets of mica that were mounted on paper guards and bound into albums. By the mid-19th century the artists had often abandoned painting couples, a man and his wife, and instead concentrated on single figures, as found here in this set.

The figures in the set are well drawn, lively and colourful, with good modeling of forms and facial features. Without inscriptions, however, some of the women especially are difficult to identify, but most are normally based on earlier identified figures. Many of the single women seem modeled on the ‘wife’ half of the earlier couples. The women normally wear the elaborate jewellery of the south, with various heavy earrings, hairpins, noserings, necklaces, bracelets and anklets, not detailed here.

References below are to comparable albums in the published catalogues of the collections of the Victoria & Albert Museum and British Museum, London. Accession numbers are included here as both collections are now on-line.

REFERENCES
Archer, M., Company Paintings: Indian Paintings of the British Period, Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 1992
Dallapiccola, A., South Indian Paintings: a Catalogue of the British Museum Collections, British Museum Press, London, 2010

EXPERT: J.P. Losty
J.P. Losty was for many years curator of Indian visual materials in the British Library in London and has published many books and articles on painting in India from the 12th to the 19th centuries.

Artiana would like to thank J.P. Losty for his expertise and assistance in preparing this catalogue entry.

Company Painting

‘Company painting’ is a broad term for a variety of hybrid styles that developed as a result of European (especially British) influence on Indian artists from the early 18th to the 19th centuries. It evolved as a way of providing paintings that would appeal to European patrons who found the purely indigenous styles not to their taste. As many of these patrons worked for the various East India companies, the painting style came to be associated with the name, although it was in fact also used for paintings produced for local rulers and other Indian patrons.

The subject matter of company paintings made for western patrons was often documentary rather than imaginative, and as a consequence, the Indian artists were required to adopt a more naturalistic approach to painting than had traditionally been usual. Europeans commissioned sets of images depicting festivals and scenes from Indian life or albums illustrating the various castes and occupations, as well as the architecture, plants and animals of the sub-continent. While most of the works were painted on paper, there was also a fashion for images of Mughal monuments and Mughal rulers and their wives painted on small plaques of ivory. This increased use of western approaches to painting coincided with the later phases of local painting styles, as manifested in centres such as Lucknow, Murshidabad and Delhi in North India and Mysore and Thanjavur in the South.